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These nurses span 13 areas of expertise, 40 years of medical advancements, and all walks of life. Here are their inspiring stories of science and service.  Our 2013 Outstanding Nurses award winners span 13 areas of expertise, 40 years of medical advancements, and all walks of life.  Here are their inspiring—and surprising—stories of science and service.  Mpls.St.Paul Magazine's Outstanding Nurses Awards are given to the top nurses in the Twin Cities metro area. Nurses are nominated by peers, patients, and the general public, and finalists and winners are chosen by an independent panel of judges and Mpls.St.Paul editorial staff.  Along with editorial staff, finalists and winners of the 2013 awards were chosen by two judges with a combined 50 years of experience: Sue Sendelbach, director of nursing research at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, and Michael Petty, cardiothoracic clinical nurse specialist at the University of Minnesota Medical Center.  Nurses are chosen based on professionalism, bedside manner, patient interaction, credentials and experience, impact on an organization, and leadership. Additional weight is given to those who received multiple nominations from multiple sources and to those nominated by their patients.  To nominate a nurse, check back in February 2014, when nominations will open again.    “My leadership with the military, and my age and maturity, transfers into the ER, and my ER experiences transfer into the military. I can’t do one without the other.”  Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation. It’s a mouthful, but it’s one of the incredible advancements Donald Brock has seen as a critical care nurse in the Air Force Reserves.  “While deployed to Germany last year, I witnessed the use of ECMO in a chest wound patient who was shot in Afghanistan,” 
Brock says. A machine oxygenated the soldier’s blood when his heart and lungs didn’t. It took a while, but “several weeks later this young man was sitting up in bed talking to his family as I prepared him for the flight back to the United States.”   Brock was so amazed by the soldier’s recovery that he immediately signed up for the military’s ECMO certification program. Then he shared the procedure with the folks at Regions Hospital (where he also works), who saw potential uses in the emergency room.  It’s all in a day’s work for Brock, who juggles two trauma-related jobs. “As a member of the United States Air Force, I have had the privilege of seeing firsthand how some of the many advances in medicine have saved lives,” he says. Lucky for us, he brings what he learns home.

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Read more: Minneapolis St.Paul Magazine's Outstanding Nurses Awards

Parent Category: CCATT
Category: CCATT News & Current Affairs

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Dr. Bill Beninati is a critical care physician and a 25 year veteran of the US Air Force.  During his AF career he helped develop the Critical Care Air Transport (CCATT) program and served as a key medical leader in that program for 13 years.  His combat experience includes transports in Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq where he also participated in rotary wing MEDEVAC.  Dr. Beninati now works for the not-for-profit Intermountain Healthcare System, conducts research, teaches medical students as an adjunct faculty member of the University of Utah School of Medicine, and provides leadership as chairman of the team overseeing critical care across the 22 hospital system.

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Parent Category: CCATT
Category: CCATT News & Current Affairs

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3/16/2012 - Minneapolis St. Paul Air Reserve Station -- Five critical care nurses from the 934th Airlift Wing's Critical Care Air Transport Team, participated in a training flight over northern Minnesota, Feb. 5.  Capt. Don Brock, the mission clinical and operations coordinator for CCATT, organized the training flight for a crew staffed by Lt. Col. Ed Galvez, Maj. Mark Testerman, Maj. Michael Mackovich, and Lt. Eric Stroup. The quarterly training flight is required for the CCATT team to practice trauma nursing skills to prepare them for deployment.  "CCATT belongs to the Aeromedical Staging Squadron when in garrison or stateside. When deployed and for simulated training missions, we fall under the Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron system," explained Brock.  During the training Feb 4, the CCATT team paired with the 934th AES which provided ground support for the CCATT. AES coordinated transport, arranging for necessary equipment such as x-ray machines, and providing food, said Brock. AES provides care for non-critical patients, when no physician is needed. AES is focused on prepping the plane, while CCATT is focused on critical patient care.  "CCATT is different," Brock said. "On the Reserve side, this is our primary duty. Our primary job is to train to go to war. So when we come to UTA, it's all business. We do a lot of flight training, and we try to make this as realistic as possible."  While deployed, CCATT provides critical care for all service members, foreign nationals, and coalition forces, and sometimes even K-9 dogs, who can suffer hearing trauma while deployed, he said.  Neurotrauma is common in their work, and they also provide treatment to patients who experience severe trauma through Improvised Explosive Device blasts, sometimes resulting in double and triple amputations, said Lt. Col. Ed Galvez, a CCATT trauma nurse specialist, a traditional reservist, and trauma nurse in Chicago.  The training day began with extracting a $67,000 manikin, a Gourmand S-3000 HAL, from the VA Medical Center's simulation lab in St. Paul, Minn. HAL is a male manikin-simulator, used for training purposes.  "It provides the most realistic medical response training that we can get as far as critical care transport providers," Brock said.

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Read more: Critical Care In The Air: CCATT Trains To Save Lives

Parent Category: CCATT
Category: CCATT News & Current Affairs

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