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These nurses span 13 areas of expertise, 40 years of medical advancements, and all walks of life. Here are their inspiring stories of science and service.  Our 2013 Outstanding Nurses award winners span 13 areas of expertise, 40 years of medical advancements, and all walks of life.  Here are their inspiring—and surprising—stories of science and service.  Mpls.St.Paul Magazine's Outstanding Nurses Awards are given to the top nurses in the Twin Cities metro area. Nurses are nominated by peers, patients, and the general public, and finalists and winners are chosen by an independent panel of judges and Mpls.St.Paul editorial staff.  Along with editorial staff, finalists and winners of the 2013 awards were chosen by two judges with a combined 50 years of experience: Sue Sendelbach, director of nursing research at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, and Michael Petty, cardiothoracic clinical nurse specialist at the University of Minnesota Medical Center.  Nurses are chosen based on professionalism, bedside manner, patient interaction, credentials and experience, impact on an organization, and leadership. Additional weight is given to those who received multiple nominations from multiple sources and to those nominated by their patients.  To nominate a nurse, check back in February 2014, when nominations will open again.    “My leadership with the military, and my age and maturity, transfers into the ER, and my ER experiences transfer into the military. I can’t do one without the other.”  Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation. It’s a mouthful, but it’s one of the incredible advancements Donald Brock has seen as a critical care nurse in the Air Force Reserves.  “While deployed to Germany last year, I witnessed the use of ECMO in a chest wound patient who was shot in Afghanistan,” 
Brock says. A machine oxygenated the soldier’s blood when his heart and lungs didn’t. It took a while, but “several weeks later this young man was sitting up in bed talking to his family as I prepared him for the flight back to the United States.”   Brock was so amazed by the soldier’s recovery that he immediately signed up for the military’s ECMO certification program. Then he shared the procedure with the folks at Regions Hospital (where he also works), who saw potential uses in the emergency room.  It’s all in a day’s work for Brock, who juggles two trauma-related jobs. “As a member of the United States Air Force, I have had the privilege of seeing firsthand how some of the many advances in medicine have saved lives,” he says. Lucky for us, he brings what he learns home.

 My leadership with the military, and my age and maturity, transfers into the ER, and my ER experiences transfer into the military. I can’t do one without the other.  Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation. It’s a mouthful, but it’s one of the incredible advancements Donald Brock has seen as a critical care nurse in the Air Force Reserves. While deployed to Germany last year, I witnessed the use of ECMO in a chest wound patient who was shot in Afghanistan, Brock says. A machine oxygenated the soldier’s blood when his heart and lungs didn’t. It took a while, but several weeks later this young man was sitting up in bed talking to his family as I prepared him for the flight back to the United States. Brock was so amazed by the soldier’s recovery that he immediately signed up for the military’s ECMO certification program. Then he shared the procedure with the folks at Regions Hospital (where he also works), who saw potential uses in the emergency room. It’s all in a day’s work for Brock, who juggles two trauma-related jobs. 'As a member of the United States Air Force, I have had the privilege of seeing firsthand how some of the many advances in medicine have saved lives,' he says. Lucky for us, he brings what he learns home.

by Stephanie Wilbur Ash | August 27, 2013

Parent Category: CCATT
Category: CCATT News & Current Affairs

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